Category Archives: editorial

The European Month of Photography

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As published in AAD earlier this month, this article provides you with an insight into The European Month of Photography, but more specifically Paris, where Paris Photo and Fotofever run in parallel. The full  article can be found HERE

Art Galleries, What Are The Options For Artists?

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Published back in October of this year, my article for AAD pertaining to art galleries, is I am confident every artist will find helpful. The full article can be read HERE.

Will Facebook’s Obscenity Police Ever Accept Photos as Art?

Yet another article on this subject matter, which can be read here: http://www.blouinartinfo.com/news/story/889699/will-facebooks-obscenity-police-ever-accept-photos-as-art#comment-423084.  In response, I have written a long and detailed comment which can also be read here-under:-

“I have read this subject matter on numerous occasions, the content of which is primarily repetitive, as the issue is always the same. Primarily, Facebook not only have no understanding of the arts, they also have no interest. The owners and the management give the impression of being uncouth and uncultured, so is it any wonder that such issues exist.

Facebook only address such issues after the event (and then only for the select few, as Facebook are essentially impossible to communicate with!). The statement above wherein you write that Facebook’s Frederic Wolens quoted Courbet’s L’Origine du Monde as an example, is amusing to say the least, and simply demonstrates a limited repertoire of excuses.

I am well acquainted with both Frode Steinicke and Luc Wouters and extremely familiar with the absurdity of the ban of Courbet’s L’Origine du Monde. A case where Facebook clearly bit off more than they could chew, and as you correctly state, where as a result “ridiculed around the world”. However, I’m not so sure that Facebook being ridiculed globally is of any major significance to Mr. Zuckerberg , as his image of a corporate dictator, now expands beyond the corporation and constantly spills into the public domain. Effectively, Mr. Zuckerberg has positioned himself as a dictator as to what is and isn’t art and also as a dictator of the public that use the Facebook platform. Effectively, users are frequently disciplined like small children with no means or rights of recourse.

With regard to your proposal that qualified art institutions should be treated differently, I find this ludicrous and in no way taking into account or respecting the status of established art galleries and the artists themselves. Why should the latter be segregated, as without the artists, the art institutions themselves would not exist, in the same way as art would not exist if curatorial responsibilities were left to Facebook (as you rightly point-out).

Additionally, a lot of the censorship resulting in accounts being blocked or disabled seem to amount to nothing more than individual victimisation. If I may take myself as an example, wherein my own personal account is on average blocked for 30 days every 2 weeks or so. As I write my account is blocked, following my having shared (yes shared not posted) a post from my own official artist’s Facebook Page. The post in question was not made by myself, but by one of several administrators of my page. The post pertained to one of my own artworks, which I subsequently shared via my personal page. As a result, my account was once again blocked, yet the artwork in question was not removed or sanctioned in any way. In my opinion, nothing more than pure victimisation.

It is also worth noting that Facebook is awash with pornography or sexually titillating images of zero artistic merit, yet these are seemingly allowed because they apparently do not breach the Facebook Terms and Conditions. Obviously an increasingly ludicrous situation therefore and not one that I envisage is going to improve anytime soon.

Moving to the subject of Pinterest, it is interesting that you should make reference to them. I also maintain a Pinterest account and of late am receiving continued notification of post that I have shared from other pages, which apparently do not meet terms and conditions. However, as it is not I who made these posts (I simply shared them!), it’s not quite clear why I am receiving notice of posts pertaining to another party. I also maintain a Pinterest Board which depicts my own artworks, none of which have been removed to date, the majority of which have elements of nudity. I have written to Pinterest on this subject (as least they have a basis of communication, which is more than can be said for Facebook!), informing them that I am opposed to them imposing their censorship policies, especially where the posts do not pertain to me. However, I have also notified them that should any of my own artwork posts be deleted, I will close my account forthwith, as under no circumstances will I condone censorship of the arts (the message in question may be viewed via my blog: http://photoconception.com/blog/?p=1115). This resulted in a standard generic response, to which I again replied, indicating that the issue required a response from a living person. To date, no further reply has been forthcoming, which suggests one of several possibilities. Either Pinterest have no living persons and are thus unable to reply, do not know how to reply or lastly have simply decided not to reply. Whatever the excuse, no reply comes as no major surprise. Ultimately however, Pinterest are not Facebook, and if they decide to follow the route of Facebook, I would not wish to bet money as to the duration they will continue to be in business.

It’s a sad world in which we live, where censorship policies seem to be more severe than they were back in the middle ages. Is this progress I ask myself, certainly it is not from an artistic perspective.”

FVM Global Magazine

FVM ~ May 2012

FVM Global is essentially an online fashion magazine based out of Los Angeles.  The current (May 2012) edition features one of my artworks from my series “Romantica”, on the front cover of the magazine, and inside the edition you will find an in-depth interview with myself, together with a gallery of an assortment of my artworks.  The article in question from the May edition of the magazine can be found HERE.

 

Met-Art Covers

"Yangtze" Cover 2010

"Wang" Cover 2007

Despite the fact that I hold a contract with the globally renowned nude art magazine “Met-Art”, I rarely contribute to them.  However in November 2010 (following on from my 2007 cover), my second cover was published, this time entitled “Yangtze”.  A search of my name via the Met-Art website will provide you more information and sample images from the two series in question.

I Misteri di Venezia in Review

I Misteri di Venezia ~ the series

I Misteri di Venezia ~ the series

I Misteri di Venezia ~ the series

My art work series I Misteri di Venezia, is the subject of a recent article written by top-rated writer Tinamarie Bernard.  The full article as published in Fearless Press, can be read HERE.

Aside from being produced as limited edition artworks, the full series of 50 artworks is scheduled for publication in 2012, alongside 50 individually written poems.  The series will have an inaugurate exhibition coinciding with the book launch in 2012 (dates and venue to be announced in due course).

Additional information on the artworks can be found HERE.

Yakuza ~ A Unique Photographic Novel

Yakuza ~ the novel

Yakuza ~ the novel

Yakuza ~ the novel

Yakuza

An Erotic Photo Novel

By Thomas Hodges and M.Christian

 

Yakuza is truly unique project about two people, a man and a woman, who, at first, felt torn between two worlds, but who come to understand – though their passion, their sexuality, the meeting of the their souls and spirits — that where they first saw conflict and isolation that there is actually a power in becoming the best of their separate worlds.

Alan is a man with the land of his birth, France, on one side and on the other his life as Yakuza, a member of Japanese organized crime.  Gaining the trust of a local family boss, his Yakuza Oyabun, he has risen through the ranks by his ruthlessness and his coolly calculating intelligence.  But no matter how high he rises within his crime family, his foreign birth will always keep him away from being truly accepted: Alan, no matter what he does or how well he does it, will always be the outsider.  That is, until he meets Natsuki, and he will understand that he is, and will always be, a part of something: the land of himself.

Natsuki is a woman caught in the strange domain where, on one side, she is Japanese, and so must be demure, polite, and most of all respectable, and on the other her own heated desires.  Her world was a one of simple colors, of a life mapped out and planned by the culture she was born into.  But then comes Alan, the exotic, the strange, the different, and she becomes enraptured by him and the colors running over his body in the form of his traditional Yakuza tattoos.  And with his colors, and his passion, will come for her a way to bridge her desires as well as her role in society.  With Alan will come a way for her to use him to paint her own unique canvas of life.

Yakuza, too, is a book that is also the best of both worlds: a project that straddles the visual and the literary, the photographic and the linguistic, the voyeuristic and the immersive.  Yakuza is a story, told with photographs – or a novel illustrated with images.

Created by famed photographic artist Thomas Hodges, and renown erotic author M.Christian, Yakuza is a beautiful, striking, and most of all, poignant work of sex, sensuality and passion.  Yes, Yakuza is explicit and erotic, but beyond the passion of its characters and its artist and writer, Yakuza is a work that does in its execution what its characters do within it: they show that despite differences, the gap between photographs and words, there is power and beauty in creating something with the strength of the two.

In Yakuza, Alan and Natsuki learn to be together, in their lives as well as their cultures, instead of apart — and so do Thomas Hodges and M.Christian demonstrate that the imagery of photography and the immersive nature of literature can also combine to create something special and truly memorable.

 

Thomas Hodges, a British national, currently residing in Italy, specializes in the art-nude and erotic-nude genres, but also produces a limited amount of work in abstract, architecture and landscape. Commercially, Thomas works in the Fashion and Beauty sectors, although this is progressively being replaced by his work in the movie industry, shooting film stills.

In 2006, Thomas founded the art movement “Imaginism”, primarily to encapsulate his own style of imagery. Regardless whether the image be that of the naked female form, an architectural monument, an urban or rural landscape of an unidentifiable abstraction, apply your imagination to see beyond what your eyes first behold!

More detailed information about Thomas Hodges can be read at Wikipedia.

His Official Website

His Commercial Website

 

M.Christian is – among many things – an acknowledged master of erotica with more than 300 stories in such anthologies as Best American Erotica, Best Gay Erotica, Best Lesbian Erotica, Best Bisexual Erotica, Best Fetish Erotica, and many, many other anthologies, magazines, and Web sites.

He is the editor of 25 anthologies including the Best S/M Erotica series, The Burning Pen, Guilty Pleasures, The Mammoth Book of Future Cops and The Mammoth Book of Tales of the Road (with Maxim Jakubowksi) and Confessions, Garden of Perverse, and Amazons (with Sage Vivant) as well as many others.

He is the author of the collections Dirty Words, Speaking Parts, The Bachelor Machine, Licks & Promises, Filthy, Love Without Gun Control, Rude Mechanicals, and Coming Together Presents M.Christian; and the novels Running Dry, The Very Bloody Marys, Me2, Brushes, and Painted Doll.

More detailed information about M.Christian can be read at Wikipedia

His Official Website

Erotic Review Magazine (The Art Issue) ~ Featured Portfolio

Erotic Review Magazine is a is a monthly UK-based lifestyle publication.  Covering eroticism and sex-related topics, it was first published in 1995 as a print magazine, migrating to an eZine format in June, 2010. In addition to the monthly magazine, available to paying subscribers as a virtual flipbook (or a downloadable PDF), the magazine’s website also features blogs and reviews available free of charge.

Erotic Review comprises feature articles, fiction, photography portfolios and a review section, taking a literary approach to eroticism and sexuality. The magazine’s stated purpose is ‘to appeal to the primary sexual organ – the brain’ which it achieves through ‘great writing, which is witty, funny, intelligent, knowledgeable’ (ref. Wikipedia).

The February edition (number 118) is entitled “The Art Issue” and features a special portfolio of my work and myself as an artist, with a full 15 page colour spread.  The featured portfolio pages can be downloaded in PDF format by clicking this LINK (be sure to view the PDF in two page format, so you can see the pages side-by-side).  The full magazine can be downloaded from the Erotic Review website, with prior subscription.

Aesthetics Now ~ 8 Page Spread!

The December issue of “Aesthetics Now“, has an 8 page spread entitled “Poetry in Motion”, featuring my artwork series “Sensuality & Desire”, which for the editorial, has been coupled with the poetry of Alison Croggon.  A great magazine, some great prose and a great series of artworks, with editions still available for purchase (contact me for additional information).

FT.com / FT Magazine – How Annie got shot

This article provides a great insight into the world of photographic art, and I count myself lucky that as a photographic artist, I’m standing on the right side of the fence!

To read the full FT Magazine article at FT.com CLICK HERE.